Benefice Newsletter for Sunday 1st May – Third Sunday of Easter 

Services this Sunday for The Alde Sandlings Benefice

Aldeburgh

8.00am

10.30am

Holy Communion

Service of the Word

Aldringham

11.00am

Holy Communion

Knodishall

9.00am

Holy Communion

Collect
Almighty Father, who in your great mercy gladdened the
disciples with the sight of the risen Lord:give us such knowledge of his presence with us, that we may be strengthened and sustained by his risen life
and serve you continually in righteousness and truth;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.

 

First Reading
Acts 9.1-6
Meanwhile Saul, still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord, went to the high priest and asked him for letters to the synagogues at Damascus, so that if he found any who belonged to the Way, men or women, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem. Now as he was going along and approaching Damascus, suddenly a light from heaven flashed around him. He fell to the ground and heard a voice saying to him, ‘Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?’ He asked, ‘Who are you, Lord?’ The reply came, ‘I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. But get up and enter the city, and you will be told what you are to do.’

Second Reading
Revelation 5.11-end
Then I looked, and I heard the voice of many angels surrounding the throne and the living creatures and the elders; they numbered myriads of myriads and thousands of thousands, singing with full voice,
‘Worthy is the Lamb that was slaughtered to receive power and wealth and wisdom and might and honour and glory and blessing!’ 
Then I heard every creature in heaven and on earth and under the earth and in the sea, and all that is in them, singing, ‘To the one seated on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honour and glory and might
for ever and ever!’ And the four living creatures said, ‘Amen!’ And the elders fell down and worshipped. 

Gospel Reading
John 21.1-19
After these things Jesus showed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias; and he showed himself in this way. Gathered there together were Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples. Simon Peter said to them, ‘I am going fishing.’ They said to him, ‘We will go with you.’ They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing. Just after daybreak, Jesus stood on the beach; but the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, ‘Children, you have no fish, have you?’ They answered him, ‘No.’ He said to them, ‘Cast the net to the right side of the boat, and you will find some.’ So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in because there were so many fish. That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, ‘It is the Lord!’ When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on some clothes, for he was naked, and jumped into the lake. But the other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, only about a hundred yards off. When they had gone ashore, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish on it, and bread. Jesus said to them, ‘Bring some of the fish that you have just caught.’ So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred and fifty-three of them; and though there were so many, the net was not torn. Jesus said to them, ‘Come and have breakfast.’ Now none of the disciples dared to ask him, ‘Who are you?’ because they knew it was the Lord. Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. This was now the third time that Jesus appeared to the disciples after he was raised from the dead. When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?’ He said to him, ‘Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Feed my lambs.’ A second time he said to him, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me?’ He said to him, ‘Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Tend my sheep.’ He said to him the third time, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me?’ Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, ‘Do you love me?’ And he said to him, ‘Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Feed my sheep. Very truly, I tell you, when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go.’ (He said this to indicate the kind of death by which he would glorify God.) After this he said to him, ‘Follow me.’

Post Communion
Living God, your Son made himself known to his disciple
in the breaking of bread: open the eyes of our faith,
that we may see him in all his redeeming work;
who is alive and reigns, now and for ever.

 

Sermon preached by The Revd Johanna Mabey at
Aldeburgh 24th April 2022

John 20:19 to end

“May the words of our mouths and the meditations of our hearts be acceptable in thy sight, O Lord our rock and our redeemer.”

In some traditions today is called Low Sunday because church attendance is low, along with energy… after the build-up and excitement of Easter, the clergy are exhausted, as are the organists, flower team, wardens, choirs and perhaps even our congregations!

In some ways it’s a lot like other weeks after: the week after the wedding, the big birthday party, the birth, the death. What now? What next? Things will never be the same, but how exactly are they different? It’s just too soon to tell….

In other ways, the problem with the week after Easter is that things aren’t that different. After forty days of preparing for the life-changing reality of the resurrection, we’re still shaken by the awful news headlines, still despairing of the situation in Ukraine, still worried about the rising cost of living… still waking up in the middle of the night with more anxieties than alleluias…

Even if the world isn’t different this week after Easter, shouldn’t we be?

There aren’t many ‘Week After’ stories in the gospels:

Mark’s in such a hurry that he wraps things up with the empty tomb. Matthew adds a few lines about Jesus appearing to the disciples in

Galilee, commissioning them to carry on. Luke tells a great story about a stranger meeting up with two disciples on the road to Emmaus, but that happens on the same day Jesus vanishes from his tomb, and the minute the disciples recognise the stranger, he’s gone, carried up into heaven and out of their sight.

John is the only one who lingers on what it’s like to be a disciple after Easter. He’s the only one with a ‘Week After’ story, about Jesus and a disciple called Didymus, the Twin: better known to most of us as Doubting Thomas.

But to my mind, Thomas wasn’t any less trusting than the rest of them. When the women ran home from the grave to tell the Disciples that Jesus wasn’t in his tomb, they didn’t believe them.

They ran to see for themselves.

When Jesus came back that same night to the house where the disciples were hiding, they believed because they saw him for themselves.

The only reason Thomas got singled out was because he wasn’t there. He didn’t get to see for himself, which is why he had questions the others didn’t have. They had evidence. He had hearsay.

He wasn’t trying to decide whether he believed Jesus had risen from the dead. He was trying to decide whether he believed what the other disciples told him, and he decided he didn’t – couldn’t – until he saw for himself what they had seen. So, his trust issue wasn’t with Jesus. It was with his brothers.

I don’t know about you, but I rather like Thomas’ honesty. I feel grateful for him, because he’s proof that even people who were right there had trouble believing that Jesus had risen from the dead.

After Jesus’ death, Thomas was as desolate as the rest of them – then he was as baffled as the rest of them when Mary said she’d seen the Lord.

After that, Thomas became the missing disciple, the one who wasn’t there. He wasn’t there in the locked house with the others that night, wasn’t there when Jesus came and stood among them, wasn’t there when Jesus gave them his peace, showed them his wounds, gave them power over sin, and bid them receive the Holy Spirit -basically everything he had to bring his little church back to life. Before they saw Jesus, it must have looked like the end of everything for the disciples. They’d had the breath knocked out of them.

No breath means no life. There’s no way forward without breath.

Before Jesus came to them, that’s how the disciples were – all locked up in the house where they met – physically and literally. Then Jesus came to breathe on them and their fear turned to rejoicing – He gave them his own breath to bring them back to life.

But Thomas wasn’t there.

In the usual interpretation of this story, Thomas’ problem was that he needed physical proof that God had raised Jesus from the dead. He wanted to weigh the evidence for himself, and without that, Thomas said, he wouldn’t believe.

But if you listen to what he says, another possibility opens up.

“Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands,” Thomas says, “and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”

It’s the wounds Thomas wants to see, not the face. He wants to touch the places where the Jesus he knew so well was hurt.

He wanted to see the marks on Jesus’ body. He wanted to reach out and touch those wounds. Only then would he believe that it mattered, that Jesus’ resurrected life meant something for every life… each and every one of us… no matter how hurt… no matter how scarred.

I’ve heard it said that if you’re still breathing, there’s more

right with you… than wrong with you!

Thomas puts it more forcefully, once he’s seen the marks on Jesus’ body for himself, he exclaims “My Lord and my God!” He wasn’t the missing disciple anymore.

Thomas was back- a week late, but back and Jesus didn’t seem to mind coming back for him alone.

So here we are, back the week after Easter, still gathering faithfully many years since the first Easter, exhausted or not on this Low Sunday.

Let’s take a deep breath together now, and remember Jesus’ words:

Blessed are we who have not seen and yet have come to believe.

The Lord is risen!
Alleluia! Alleluia!

 

A Time and a Place: George Crabbe, Aldeburgh and Suffolk by Frances Gibb

We are very excited to share the news that one of
Aldeburgh’s congregation has had a book published.
Frances has very kindly written summary for us about her book.

Sheltered close to the eastern wall of the parish church of St Peter and St Paul is a tall double gravestone. It is deeply weathered, its inscriptions almost obliterated.

The graves are those of Mary and George Crabbe (1725-80 and 1733-86) whose son George was the eighteenth-century poet, clergyman, and surgeon-apothecary. Their tombstone is the only physical link to the Crabbes’ lives in Aldeburgh three centuries ago.

Inside the church, in a rather dark hidden corner, is a marble bust to the Crabbes’ poet son. The sculpture was carved in 1847 by the English sculptor Thomas Thurlow, who created various church memorials in the locality of his birthplace in Saxmundham. 

Again, the bust is one of the only remaining signs that Crabbe the poet lived and grew up in Aldeburgh, the son of a collector of salt taxes who worked on Slaughden quay. 

Yet appropriately, the sculpture is sited opposite the famous stained glass window by John Piper – a tribute to Benjamin Britten. Appropriate, because Crabbe (1754 -1832) is best known for his poem Peter Grimes, which inspired Benjamin Britten’s opera of that name. It is a tale of a brutal sadistic fisherman who was accused of murdering his boy apprentices, and the opera in 1945 put Britten on the world stage as a composer. 

Most people who live in Aldeburgh or visit will know of Britten; fewer know of Crabbe, even if they notice Crabbe Street. Britten is by far the bigger name, the louder voice of the two men. But it was Britten’s discovery of Crabbe’s poems, when the composer was living in California, that brought him home to Suffolk and inspired the writing of Peter Grimes. 

The year was 1941: Britten and Pears, both pacifists, had left England, then at war, to live in California. They came across an article about Crabbe in The Listener magazine written by E. M. Foster. The piece later prompted the composer to say: “I did not know any of the poems of Crabbe at that time, but reading about him gave such a feeling of nostalgia for Suffolk, where I have always lived, that I searched for a copy of his works.”

So began the association between Britten and Crabbe, with Aldeburgh the connection. Crabbe had a love-hate relationship with the town he called a “little venal borough” and his early experiences there dominate his writings.  

Even when he left Suffolk – where he lived for more than half his life – and moved further inland, Aldeburgh and Suffolk remained an unbroken thread through his works, the flavour and piquancy that gave his poetry its hard realistic edge. 

Crabbe was not solely a professional poet: he set out to be an apothecary-surgeon, although he never had the funds to complete his medical training. In a moment of epiphany, he stood at the so-called Leech Pond in Aldeburgh (a long-lost site) and decided to abandon all pursuit of medicine, heading instead to London to seek his fortune as a poet with just a few pounds in his pocket. 

By good fortune and talent, he found a patron – none other than the leading statesman and philosopher Edmund Burke. But Burke recognised that Crabbe needed a regular income – and also that Crabbe was a man of faith. So it was that the aspiring poet became a clergyman. 

Crabbe was duly admitted as a deacon in London in December 1781 and licensed as a curate to the rector of Aldeburgh, the Rev. James Benet. He was ordained priest the following year in Norwich. So Crabbe came back to Aldeburgh – somewhat to his dismay: he had failed in his endeavours in the medical profession and was not remembered with any great affection or respect by the townsfolk.

His misgivings were justified: his first sermon was not well received. The pulpit in our church is the one from which Crabbe would have preached. It was made in 1632 by Charles Warne and James Garrard as a copy of the pulpit in Kelsale. Crabbe delivered his sermon on 20 January 1782, taking as his theme: “Honour all men. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honour the king.” (1 Peter 2: 1). The congregation did not seem to heed the message. Later Crabbe complained: “I have been unkindly received in the place.”

Crabbe secured a move to another curacy in Leicestershire. But Aldeburgh continued to be the main influence in his writings. And neither he, nor his congregation then, could have guessed that one day, the church would boast a marble bust in his honour. 

A Time and a Place: George Crabbe, Aldeburgh and Suffolk by Frances Gibb

Published by The Lutterworth Press, April 2022.
Launch: Aldeburgh Bookshop – Friday May 13th at 6 pm

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Next Week
Sunday 8th May
Fourth Sunday of Easter

 

NOTICES

A Call for Helpers and Keys (Aldeburgh)
You will all be aware that I have been the sole churchwarden for almost two years now. During this time, I have been blessed with the generous assistance of Adrian Brown, our Treasurer and Derek Cook, our Deputy Churchwarden. The role of churchwarden is personally rewarding but also demanding of one’s time, energy and sometimes one’s patience. Every church needs two churchwardens, and this is especially important for a church the size of Aldeburgh Parish Church. As we approach our Annual Parochial Church Meeting, I am concerned that we may enter another year with only one churchwarden. I am happy to continue as a churchwarden, but this is not a job that I can continue to do on my own. We very much need someone with energy and enthusiasm to join me as churchwarden. As we return to offering a variety of services and move to larger congregations, we find that we need more helpers in our church. We particularly need sacristans, servers, and cleaners. Are you able to offer your time and help? Our cleaning team gather in the church on Saturday morning after Morning Prayer so please come along and join in. If you are interested in helping to prepare for and possibly serving at our communion services, please contact either myself, Claire our Administrator, or one of our priests. We can explain what is involved and offer full training.

We need additional keys for our church volunteers.  Are there any keys out there that aren’t used anymore?  Perhaps you have stood down from your role within the church but still have keys.  If you could let me or Claire know, we can arrange returning of the keys and then update our records.   This would be very helpful and prevent an unnecessary expense of having to have new keys cut. 
Ken Smith

Church of England and Diocese Online Worship

There are many online services you can view from the Church of England and our cathedral. Here are some links below.

Church of England website

https://www.churchofengland.org/
prayer-and-worship/church-online/weekly-online-services

Church of England Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/
thechurchofengland/

Church of England YouTube channel

https://www.youtube.com/
channel/UCLecK8GovYoaYzIgyOElKZg

St Edmundsbury Cathedral Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/
stedscathedral

Weekly Benefice Newsletter

If you would like something added to the weekly newsletter that is relevant to the Benefice, please do let Claire know and we will do our best to include it the following week.

All requests by 4pm on Thursday please

Food Banks at the East of England Co-op

Foodbanks provide a valuable service to those in need in our communities. The Aldeburgh Co-op and Solar in Leiston are doing a grand job in collecting food donations, which are collected regularly and distributed. So please look out for the various collection baskets.

Pilgrims Together on Wednesdays

The Pilgrims worship together every Wednesday.
You are all more than welcome to join them via Zoom.  
The worship starts at 6.30pm (Zoom call opens from 6.10pm) and the call is then left open after the worship time for people to catch up.   People are welcome to email pilgrimstogether473@gmail.com 
to receive a copy, be added to our mailing list or for the Zoom links.

Saturday 7th May Pilgrim Community Breakfast and Ramble starting at the Parrot Pub at 9.30am for Breakfast.

Benefice Newsletter for Sunday 24th April – Second Sunday of Easter  

Services this Sunday for The Alde Sandlings Benefice

Aldeburgh

10.30am

6.00pm

Holy Communion

Evening Prayer

Aldringham

11.00am

Service of the Word

Knodishall

9.00am

Morning Prayer

Message from Revd James Marston

As we enter this Eastertide and celebrate the joy of our faith, let me begin by thanking everyone involved with the Easter celebrations across the benefice. We thanked God, with music, flowers, church services, welcome, and enthusiasm, the very best of the Alde Sandlings – to swelled congregations and plenty of visitors to our churches.  

Easter is a time of refreshment and renewal, and we have much to look forward with a new priest-in-charge due in a matter of weeks.  

In the meantime, as we continue to wait patiently and with joy in our hearts, I wish you all a happy and enjoyable Eastertide.  

James  

Collect
Almighty Father, you have given your only Son to die for our sins
and to rise again for our justification: grant us so to put away
the leaven of malice and wickedness that we may always serve you
in pureness of living and truth; through the merits of your
Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.

First Reading
Acts 5.27-32
When they had brought them, they had them stand before the council. The high priest questioned them, saying, ‘We gave you strict orders not to teach in this name, yet here you have filled Jerusalem with your teaching and you are determined to bring this man’s blood on us.’ But Peter and the apostles answered, ‘We must obey God rather than any human authority. The God of our ancestors raised up Jesus, whom you had killed by hanging him on a tree. God exalted him at his right hand as Leader and Saviour, so that he might give repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins. And we are witnesses to these things, and so is the Holy Spirit whom God has given to those who obey him.’

Second Reading
Revelation 1.4-8
John to the seven churches that are in Asia:
Grace to you and peace from him who is and who was and who is to come, and from the seven spirits who are before his throne, and from Jesus Christ, the faithful witness, the firstborn of the dead, and the ruler of the kings of the earth. To him who loves us and freed us from our sins by his blood, and made us to be a kingdom, priests serving his God and Father, to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen. 
Look! He is coming with the clouds; every eye will see him,
even those who pierced him; and on his account all the tribes of the earth will wail. So it is to be. Amen.
‘I am the Alpha and the Omega’, says the Lord God, who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty. 

Gospel Reading
John 20.19-end
When it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and the doors of the house where the disciples had met were locked for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said, ‘Peace be with you.’ After he said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, ‘Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you.’ When he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, ‘Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven them; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained.’ But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, ‘We have seen the Lord.’ But he said to them, ‘Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.’ A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, ‘Peace be with you.’ Then he said to Thomas, ‘Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.’ Thomas answered him, ‘My Lord and my God!’  Jesus said to him, ‘Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.’ Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book. But these are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name. 

Post Communion

Lord God our Father, through our Saviour Jesus Christ you have assured your children of eternal life and in baptism have made us one with him: deliver us from the death of sin and raise us to new life in your love, in the fellowship of the Holy Spirit, by the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Sermon preached by The Revd James Marston at
Aldeburgh 17th April 2022

Easter Sunday John 20 1-18 2022

May I speak in the name of the living God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit

In the words of the psalmist: “This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.”

Easter Sunday 2022 is, it seems to me, cause for a double celebration. Not only is it Easter – the biggest feast of the church’s year which marks the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ – but also the future is looking bright.

We have come through much together, something of a time of insecurity and uncertainty inevitably brought about by vacancy and yet we still have hope.

But we are still going strong, the choir is still singing, the organ is still playing, the formidable flower ladies are still ruling the roost, the bells are being rung, the churchwarden still knows what’s going on, even the curate has learnt one or two things.

And indeed, ladies and gentlemen on a personal note, and I know that has concerned many of you, I can announce this morning that my little blue car should be with us again shortly, so you’ll all soon know where I am and what I’m up to once more.

Prayer and worship, gratitude, and service, at the heart of our community, and the future for our church and our benefice looks bright. We have much to be thankful for and much to look forward to.

And today, Ester Sunday, always something of a new beginning for us all as we journey in faith, heralded, of course, by the renewed life of spring that we cannot fail to notice around us. We can once again be enthused by the joy of Easter and the celebration of the victory of God.

Today, this Easter morning, is one we can all be grateful for and a reason for the joy in our hearts.

We hear from the Gospel accounts, that following the death of Jesus and the unimaginable horrors of the crucifixion, that Christ appears to them, though they don’t always recognise him immediately.

Indeed, in John’s account the recognition of Jesus by Mary comes aurally not visually from the moment he mentions her name. Begging the observation, of course, that our Lord may communicate with us in ways we might not expect or which we might find surprising, or which we sometimes, indeed often, fail to notice.

Nonetheless, the result of the resurrection, in those early days, is that the followers of Jesus were utterly compelled to come out of hiding and risk their own lives to tell others of what they had experienced and share the joy of faith.

Whatever the resurrection was, and it often strikes me as something of a mystery that is hard to pin down in human words, it was life changing and transformative for those who believed.

And it remains the case today, the resurrection is still life changing and transformative. The resurrected Christ has not gone away.

And from those first confused and unsure witnesses to the rest of the disciples to St Paul onwards, over the last 2,000 years countless numbers of people have experienced and know the presence of Jesus in their lives.

And that is also what we are celebrating today, and as Christians we are no less compelled to retell the story share the faith and hold on to the hope of salvation and eternal life.

As we come together again and pray the ancient thanksgiving of the Eucharist, I am reminded that Jesus is here among us as ever.

In the bread and wine of communion, in each other, in the Body of Christ that makes up this worshipping community in this Holy and sacred place, the resurrected Christ is present.

It seems to me that Easter Sunday is the firing pistol we may sometimes need to reenergise and reinvigorate our faith.

Not least because it is a reminder of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, that extraordinary mysterious and mind boggling event on which our faith is based, and for which we must thank again and again almighty God.

“This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.”

I wish you all a joyful and happy Easter.

Amen.

 

Next Week
Sunday 1st May
Third Sunday of Easter

NOTICES

A Call for Helpers and Keys (Aldeburgh)
You will all be aware that I have been the sole churchwarden for almost two years now. During this time, I have been blessed with the generous assistance of Adrian Brown, our Treasurer and Derek Cook, our Deputy Churchwarden. The role of churchwarden is personally rewarding but also demanding of one’s time, energy and sometimes one’s patience. Every church needs two churchwardens, and this is especially important for a church the size of Aldeburgh Parish Church. As we approach our Annual Parochial Church Meeting, I am concerned that we may enter another year with only one churchwarden. I am happy to continue as a churchwarden, but this is not a job that I can continue to do on my own. We very much need someone with energy and enthusiasm to join me as churchwarden. As we return to offering a variety of services and move to larger congregations, we find that we need more helpers in our church. We particularly need sacristans, servers, and cleaners. Are you able to offer your time and help? Our cleaning team gather in the church on Saturday morning after Morning Prayer so please come along and join in. If you are interested in helping to prepare for and possibly serving at our communion services, please contact either myself, Claire our Administrator, or one of our priests. We can explain what is involved and offer full training.

We need additional keys for our church volunteers.  Are there any keys out there that aren’t used anymore?  Perhaps you have stood down from your role within the church but still have keys.  If you could let me or Claire know, we can arrange returning of the keys and then update our records.   This would be very helpful and prevent an unnecessary expense of having to have new keys cut. 
Ken Smith

Church of England and Diocese Online Worship

There are many online services you can view from the Church of England and our cathedral. Here are some links below.

Church of England website

https://www.churchofengland.org/
prayer-and-worship/church-online/weekly-online-services

Church of England Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/
thechurchofengland/

Church of England YouTube channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel/
UCLecK8GovYoaYzIgyOElKZg

St Edmundsbury Cathedral Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/
stedscathedral

Update from David Jenkins – Aid for Ukraine
Firstly may I thank you most sincerely for your most generous donations to the Appeal in aid of Ukraine.  Lately I have had a number of enquires as too when the collection is to re-commence. This morning I have been in contact with Anglia Freight in Ipswich who have been storing, sorting, and dispatching the donations. They have told me that the situation for the people distributing within Ukraine is currently so dangerous that they are unable to accept for the time being any more goods. I have been assured that as soon as the situation becomes safer, they will resume sending aid out to Ukraine and that I shall be the first to hear.  Love and Prayer to you all David.

 

Weekly Benefice Newsletter

If you would like something added to the weekly newsletter that is relevant to the Benefice, please do let Claire know and we will do our best to include it the following week.

All requests by 4pm on Thursday please

Food Banks at the East of England Co-op

Foodbanks provide a valuable service to those in need in our communities. The Aldeburgh Co-op and Solar in Leiston are doing a grand job in collecting food donations, which are collected regularly and distributed. So please look out for the various collection baskets.

 

Concerts at Aldeburgh – 11th and 12th May

We are delighted to announce that the Fitzwilliam String Quartet will be returning to Aldeburgh Parish Church on the 11th & 12th May for two concerts, both starting at 7pm. Music includes Beethoven, Mendelssohn, and Britten. All Welcome. £12 cash only on the door.

Pilgrims Together on Wednesdays

The Pilgrims worship together every Wednesday.
You are all more than welcome to join them via Zoom.  
The worship starts at 6.30pm (Zoom call opens from 6.10pm) and the call is then left open after the worship time for people to catch up.   People are welcome to email pilgrimstogether473@gmail.com 
to receive a copy, to be added to our mailing list, or for the Zoom links.

Saturday 7th May Pilgrim Community Breakfast and Ramble starting at the Parrot Pub at 9.30am for Breakfast.

Benefice Newsletter for Sunday 17th April – Easter Sunday

Services this Sunday for The Alde Sandlings Benefice

 

Aldeburgh

6.30am

8.00am

10.30am

Benefice Sunrise Service -Thorpeness Beach

Holy Communion

Holy Communion

Aldringham

Friston

11.00am

9.45am

Holy Communion

Holy Communion

Knodishall

9.00am

Holy Communion

Message from Revd James Marston

Tomorrow, we celebrate the great feast of Easter as we mark the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Amid the excitement and joy of the fresh start that Easter brings to us all on our journey of faith, I think we can also take a moment to congratulate ourselves and our communities as we look back over the last few months.

All the church communities have pulled together in order to continue with worship and the pastoral care required by a lively and thriving benefice as best we can, and for that we can be grateful and proud.

Tomorrow we rejoice in the good news of the risen Christ and at this time the Alde Sandlings benefice is looking towards the future with a new priest-in-charge due to be among us in a few short weeks.

This is a time of good news indeed and we have much to celebrate and much to look forward to.

Happy Easter to you all.

James

Let us pray

God almighty, we praise your holy name in this joyful Eastertide. We thank you, Lord, because through your death and resurrection we have won the victory and your redeeming grace and love. Loving Father God, fill us with new life so that we may love one another and do what you want us to do in sharing your love with those who don’t know you. In Jesus’ name we pray.
Amen

 

Collect
Lord of all life and power,
who through the mighty resurrection of your Son
overcame the old order of sin and death
to make all things new in him:
grant that we, being dead to sin
and alive to you in Jesus Christ,
may reign with him in glory;
to whom with you and the Holy Spirit
be praise and honour, glory and might,
now and in all eternity.


First Reading
Isaiah 65.17-end
For I am about to create new heavens and a new earth;
the former things shall not be remembered or come to mind. 
But be glad and rejoice for ever in what I am creating;
for I am about to create Jerusalem as a joy, and its people as a delight. 
I will rejoice in Jerusalem, and delight in my people; no more shall the sound of weeping be heard in it, or the cry of distress. No more shall there be in it an infant that lives but a few days, or an old person who does not live out a lifetime; for one who dies at a hundred years will be considered a youth, and one who falls short of a hundred will be considered accursed. They shall build houses and inhabit them; they shall plant vineyards and eat their fruit.  They shall not build and another inhabit; they shall not plant and another eat; for like the days of a tree shall the days of my people be, and my chosen shall long enjoy the work of their hands.  They shall not labour in vain, or bear children for calamity; for they shall be offspring blessed by the Lord—and their descendants as well.  Before they call I will answer, while they are yet speaking I will hear. The wolf and the lamb shall feed together, the lion shall eat straw like the ox; but the serpent—its food shall be dust! They shall not hurt or destroy on all my holy mountain, says the Lord. 

Second Reading
Acts 10.34-43
Then Peter began to speak to them: ‘I truly understand that God shows no partiality, but in every nation anyone who fears him and does what is right is acceptable to him. You know the message he sent to the people of Israel, preaching peace by Jesus Christ—he is Lord of all. That message spread throughout Judea, beginning in Galilee after the baptism that John announced: how God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power; how he went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with him. We are witnesses to all that he did both in Judea and in Jerusalem. They put him to death by hanging him on a tree; but God raised him on the third day and allowed him to appear, not to all the people but to us who were chosen by God as witnesses, and who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. He commanded us to preach to the people and to testify that he is the one ordained by God as judge of the living and the dead. All the prophets testify about him that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name.’

Gospel Reading
John 20.1-18
Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, ‘They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.’ Then Peter and the other disciple set out and went towards the tomb. The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent down to look in and saw the linen wrappings lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed; for as yet they did not understand the scripture, that he must rise from the dead. Then the disciples returned to their homes. But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb; and she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had been lying, one at the head and the other at the feet. They said to her, ‘Woman, why are you weeping?’ She said to them, ‘They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.’ When she had said this, she turned round and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, ‘Woman, why are you weeping? For whom are you looking?’ Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, ‘Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.’ Jesus said to her, ‘Mary!’ She turned and said to him in Hebrew, ‘Rabbouni!’ (which means Teacher). Jesus said to her, ‘Do not hold on to me, because I have not yet ascended to the Father. But go to my brothers and say to them, “I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.” ’Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, ‘I have seen the Lord’; and she told them that he had said these things to her.

Post Communion
God of Life, who for our redemption gave your only-begotten Son 
to the death of the cross,and by his glorious resurrection
have delivered us from the power of our enemy:
grant us so to die daily to sin, that we may evermore live
with him in the joy of his risen life;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

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Sermon preached by The Revd James Marston at
Aldeburgh 10th April 2022

Palm Sunday

There is an old joke among clergy, what is the difference between an organist and a terrorist. The answer, of course, is that one can negotiate with a terrorist.

Indeed, since I have made the transgression from church organist to church clergyman I’m not sure that we clergy are always the easiest with which to engage with what people nowadays call “constructive talks” when they want their own way.

Indeed, there is another old joke.

What have a clergyman and a shoe got in common? The last thing to go is the tongue.

And over the last three years that I have been among you it may not have escaped your notice that not only do I like my own way, but I also like the sound of my own voice.

But today, after that marathon reading- the Liturgy of the passion – in which we heard the story again of the arrest trial and execution and death of Jesus, I cannot help but think that the scripture does the talking.

We retell the story on Palm Sunday not for the clever exegesis or apposite exposition of subtle biblical hermetic by the priest, we retell it because it simply serves to remind us of the horror, injustice, and violence of the cross. The death of our God whom we worship today is part and parcel of our faith.

Indeed, Palm Sunday itself, in which we celebrate the victorious entry of Jesus into Jerusalem is something of a bittersweet moment. Jesus, who has been exercising his ministry for three years comes up to the capital city in triumph, to be met just a few days later with the most appalling humiliation.

We approach Holy Week with all this in our minds and in our hearts, that before the glory of the resurrection which we celebrate a week today, the church tradition takes us again through the emotions and highs and lows of the story we have just heard and know so well.

This is because, it seems to me, we all need to hear the story of our faith, our story, again and again. Faith, belief in the risen Christ, is so full of doubt so full of difficulties and so full of challenge that we need to be reminded often of why we believe at all.

Repeating ourselves also points towards another aspect of faith that is its often easy to forget and it is this, that our Christian journey is not a sprint but a marathon. Taken step by step over months, years and decades as we come closer to God.

Indeed our Lent course this year – a simple weekly bible study meeting with which I admit to facing with some trepidation, I thought it might get in the way of the other things I seem to be up to – has taught me a lesson and it is this: That listening is far more important than talking and that by listening it became obvious to me that there is still much I can learn from other Christians around me about our faith, and still much insight I have yet to discover.

I doubt I am alone in this, I suspect we all need to be reminded, all feel we must try harder, all feel there is so much we don’t know about the beliefs which we claim we espouse.

So my challenge to you and to me this Palm Sunday, is to embrace this Holy Week, use it as a reminder and a chance to re-spark that curiosity which brought us to faith in the first place. Read the passion liturgy again, talk to others around you about what that which you discover or notice. Ask questions, seek God.

We are on a long journey together and it is only together that we can take those small steps into the mystery of the Easter on which rests the extraordinary Christian faith.

Amen

Next Week
Sunday 24th April
Second Sunday of Easter

✟ Church of England and Diocese Online Worship

There are many online services you can view from the Church of England and our cathedral. Here are some links below.

Church of England website

https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-
and-worship/church-online/weekly-online-services

Church of England Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/thechurchofengland/

Church of England YouTube channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel/
UCLecK8GovYoaYzIgyOElKZg

St Edmundsbury Cathedral Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/
stedscathedral

Easter Messy Church

A huge thank-you and well done to everyone who supported and helped at our Easter Messy Church last Saturday.  We had a really wonderful attendance; 35 children and 36 adults.

A group of children sitting in a church

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The children listened 

beautifully as Fran, and I told the Easter story and we
talked about the true

 meaning of Easter and the events of Holy Week.

We had a very egg-citing Easter egg hunt inside the church, and everyone enjoyed singing and doing all the different Easter crafts and cooking activities that were on offer.

It was such a joyful morning and so good to be back after an enforced two year break due to Covid! Thank you again for being part of this extremely valuable ministry with children and families in the heart of our community. Do take a look at Fran’s beautiful art project on the display board and the prayer tree in the children’s area at Aldeburgh church to see some of what we got up to.

Revd Jo

We wish you all a very
Happy Easter

NOTICES

Weekly Benefice Newsletter

If you would like something added to the weekly newsletter that is relevant to the Benefice, please do let Claire know and we will do our best to include it the following week.

All requests by 4pm on Thursday please

Food Banks at the East of England Co-op

Foodbanks provide a valuable service to those in need in our communities. The Aldeburgh Co-op and Solar in Leiston are doing a grand job in collecting food donations, which are collected regularly and distributed. So please look out for the various collection baskets.

Pilgrims Together on Wednesdays

The Pilgrims worship together every Wednesday.
You are all more than welcome to join them via Zoom.  
The worship starts at 6.30pm (Zoom call opens from 6.10pm) and the call is then left open after the worship time for people to catch up.   People are welcome to email pilgrimstogether473@gmail.com 
to receive a copy, be added to our mailing list, or for the Zoom links.

Friday 22nd April F2F Pilgrims 6.30pm Aldeburgh Parish Hall Celtic Worship followed by a time of fellowship

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BANK HOLIDAY & STAFF TRAINING CLOSURE DATES
The surgery will be closed on Bank Holiday Monday 2nd May.
The surgery will be closed for staff training on Wednesday 18th May from 13.00. When the surgery is closed, please call NHS 111.
Text messages
Some patients have received duplicate text messages. If a phone number is on more than one patient’s record, that number may receive multiple texts about the same subject. Please contact the surgery and check your contact details if this has happened to you.
www.thepeninsulapractice.co.uk

Benefice Newsletter for Sunday 10th April – Palm Sunday

A Prayer for Ukraine
God of peace and justice,
We pray for the people of Ukraine today.
We pray for peace and the laying down of weapons.
We pray for those who fear for tomorrow,
that your Spirit of comfort would draw near to them.
We pray for those with power over war or peace,
for wisdom, discernment, and compassion to guide their decisions.
Above all, we pray for all your precious children, at risk and in fear,
that you would hold and protect them.
We pray in the name of Jesus, the Prince of Peace.
Amen.

Archbishop Justin Welby, Archbishop Stephen Cottrell

DEC Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal – World Vision UK
A message from Bishop Martin
“The crisis in Ukraine is creating a humanitarian catastrophe, as all of us can see from the daily news reports.  Bishop Mike and I are calling on all the parishes and congregations of the Diocese this Lent to raise funds through collections, individual gifts, events, and activities, to respond to the terrible situation the people of Ukraine are facing – both in the country and as refugees.

We are very grateful to be in partnership with World Vision who will receive our donations and handle the gift aid.

Be assured that every pound goes directly to those in need. World Vision is also part of the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC), whose appeal is supported by the UK Government.

We ask you to be as generous as possible, and to continue to pray fervently for the end of the military operation and for peace.

With prayers for you, and for the children and families affected by the conflict in Ukraine.”

Bishop Martin

How your donation helps

The funds you donate to this emergency appeal will support emergency response for displaced children and families in Ukraine and neighbouring countries. We will use donations in Ukraine through partners when it is possible. If thisis not possible or in the unlikely event we receive more donations than we need for this emergency, the donations will be used to help displaced and refugee populations elsewhere around the world.

content.wvunited.org

You can donate by visiting the World Vision UK website here:

https://content.wvunited.org/en-gb/emergencies/ukraine-crisis-eds-ips-appeal/#donate

Aldeburgh Parish Church has pre-labelled
Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal gift envelopes into which you can put your donation, and then place into one of the donation boxes, or hand to the churchwarden,
or the treasurer

Services this Sunday for The Alde Sandlings Benefice

Aldeburgh

10.30am

Holy Communion

Aldringham

Friston

11.00am

9.00am

Service of the Word

Holy Communion

Knodishall

9.00am

Morning Prayer

Message from Revd James Marston

Dear Everyone, 

This is without doubt an exciting time for our churches – the benefice has appointed a new priest-in-charge and Rev’d Sarah will soon be with us and leading us into a new chapter. I am personally delighted at this appointment and wish you all, and her, all the very best for the future. 

Perhaps, in the coming weeks, the church communities of our benefice might like to think about how we might help pave the way for Rev’d Sarah: What support she might need as she takes up this post? How can you help welcome a new priest-in-charge? What challenges might she face? How can your church assist and support her ministry among you in the months and years to come?  

Moreover, we have the excitement of Easter just around the corner. As the season of Lent draws to an end and we mark Holy Week I wish you a prayerful and peaceful time as we draw closer to God and the joy of our faith. 

One final note I’m hoping to see as many of you as possible on the beach at Thorpeness as we welcome in the day that marks the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ and the hope on which the Christian faith is based. 

With all my prayers

James

 

Collect
Almighty and everlasting God,
who in your tender love towards the human race 
sent your Son our Saviour Jesus Christ to take upon him our flesh
and to suffer death upon the cross:
grant that we may follow the example of his patience and humility,
and also be made partakers of his resurrection;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.

The Liturgy of the Passion

First Reading
Isaiah 50.4-9a
The Lord God has given me the tongue of a teacher,
that I may know how to sustain the weary with a word.
Morning by morning he wakens—wakens my ear to listen as those who are taught. 
The Lord God has opened my ear, and I was not rebellious,
I did not turn backwards. I gave my back to those who struck me,
and my cheeks to those who pulled out the beard; I did not hide my face
from insult and spitting.  The Lord God helps me; therefore I have not been disgraced; therefore I have set my face like flint, and I know that I shall not be put to shame; he who vindicates me is near. Who will contend with me? Let us stand up together. Who are my adversaries? Let them confront me. It is the Lord God who helps me;
who will declare me guilty? All of them will wear out like a garment;
the moth will eat them up. 

Second Reading
Philippians 2.5-11
Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God as something to be exploited, but emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, being born in human likeness. And being found in human form, he humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death—even death on a cross. Therefore God also highly exalted him and gave him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bend,
in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. 

Gospel Reading
Luke 23.1-49
Then the assembly rose as a body and brought Jesus before Pilate. They began to accuse him, saying, ‘We found this man perverting our nation, forbidding us to pay taxes to the emperor, and saying that he himself is the Messiah, a king.’ Then Pilate asked him, ‘Are you the king of the Jews?’ He answered, ‘You say so.’ Then Pilate said to the chief priests and the crowds, ‘I find no basis for an accusation against this man.’ But they were insistent and said, ‘He stirs up the people by teaching throughout all Judea, from Galilee where he began even to this place.’ When Pilate heard this, he asked whether the man was a Galilean. And when he learned that he was under Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent him off to Herod, who was himself in Jerusalem at that time. When Herod saw Jesus, he was very glad, for he had been wanting to see him for a long time, because he had heard about him and was hoping to see him perform some sign. He questioned him at some length, but Jesus gave him no answer. The chief priests and the scribes stood by, vehemently accusing him. Even Herod with his soldiers treated him with contempt and mocked him; then he put an elegant robe on him, and sent him back to Pilate. That same day Herod and Pilate became friends with each other; before this they had been enemies. Pilate then called together the chief priests, the leaders, and the people, and said to them, ‘You brought me this man as one who was perverting the people; and here I have examined him in your presence and have not found this man guilty of any of your charges against him. Neither has Herod, for he sent him back to us. Indeed, he has done nothing to deserve death. I will therefore have him flogged and release him.’ Then they all shouted out together, ‘Away with this fellow! Release Barabbas for us!’ (This was a man who had been put in prison for an insurrection that had taken place in the city, and for murder.)  Pilate, wanting to release Jesus, addressed them again; but they kept shouting, ‘Crucify, crucify him!’ A third time he said to them, ‘Why, what evil has he done? I have found in him no ground for the sentence of death; I will therefore have him flogged and then release him.’ But they kept urgently demanding with loud shouts that he should be crucified; and their voices prevailed. So Pilate gave his verdict that their demand should be granted. He released the man they asked for, the one who had been put in prison for insurrection and murder, and he handed Jesus over as they wished. As they led him away, they seized a man, Simon of Cyrene, who was coming from the country, and they laid the cross on him, and made him carry it behind Jesus. A great number of the people followed him, and among them were women who were beating their breasts and wailing for him. But Jesus turned to them and said, ‘Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me, but weep for yourselves and for your children. For the days are surely coming when they will say, “Blessed are the barren, and the wombs that never bore, and the breasts that never nursed.” Then they will begin to say to the mountains, “Fall on us”; and to the hills, “Cover us.” For if they do this when the wood is green, what will happen when it is dry?’ Two others also, who were criminals, were led away to be put to death with him. When they came to the place that is called The Skull, they crucified Jesus there with the criminals, one on his right and one on his left. Then Jesus said, ‘Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing.’ And they cast lots to divide his clothing. And the people stood by, watching; but the leaders scoffed at him, saying, ‘He saved others; let him save himself if he is the Messiah of God, his chosen one!’ The soldiers also mocked him, coming up and offering him sour wine, and saying, ‘If you are the King of the Jews, save yourself!’ There was also an inscription over him, ‘This is the King of the Jews.’ One of the criminals who were hanged there kept deriding him and saying, ‘Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us!’ But the other rebuked him, saying, ‘Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? And we indeed have been condemned justly, for we are getting what we deserve for our deeds, but this man has done nothing wrong.’ Then he said, ‘Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.’ He replied, ‘Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in Paradise.’ It was now about noon, and darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon, while the sun’s light failed; and the curtain of the temple was torn in two. Then Jesus, crying with a loud voice, said, ‘Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.’ Having said this, he breathed his last. When the centurion saw what had taken place, he praised God and said, ‘Certainly this man was innocent.’ And when all the crowds who had gathered there for this spectacle saw what had taken place, they returned home, beating their breasts. But all his acquaintances, including the women who had followed him from Galilee, stood at a distance, watching these things.

Post Communion
Lord Jesus Christ,
you humbled yourself in taking the form of a servant,
and in obedience died on the cross for our salvation:
give us the mind to follow you
and to proclaim you as Lord and King,
to the glory of God the Father.

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✟ Church of England and Diocese Online Worship

There are many online services you can view from the Church of England and our cathedral. Here are some links below.

Church of England website

https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-and-worship/
church-online/weekly-online-services

Church of England Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/
thechurchofengland/

Church of England YouTube channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel/
UCLecK8GovYoaYzIgyOElKZg

St Edmundsbury Cathedral Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/
stedscathedral

Sermon preached by The Revd James Marston at
Aldringham 3rd April 2022

‘Leave her alone. She bought it so that she might keep it for the day of my burial. You always have the poor with you, but you do not always have me.’ 

May I speak in the name of the living God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit,  

A whacking great sunset bathed level and drain 
From Kirkby with Muckby to Beckby-on-Bain, 
And I saw, as I journeyed, my marketing done, 
Old Caisterby tower take the last of the sun. 

 The night air grew nippy.  An autumn mist roll’d 
(In a scent of dead cabbages) down from the wold, 
In the ocean of silence that flooded me round 
The crunch of the wheels was a comforting sound. 

The lane lengthened narrowly into the night 
With the Bain on its left bank, the drain on its right, 
And feebly the carriage-lamps glimmered ahead 
When all of a sudden the pony fell dead. 

 For the Betjeman fans among us Sir John’s poem tells the story of a mad rector in a remote Lincolnshire church.  

It is, of course, something of a whimsical poem – clergymen are never strange or odd – but I do think Betjeman paints an evocative picture as he builds up with little details to the somewhat unnerving climax of the tale.  Indeed we can feel ourselves there, at the scene as Betjeman continues.  

As down swung the tenor, a beacon of sound, 
Over listening acres of waterlogged ground 
I stood by the tombs to see pass and repass 
The gleam of a taper, through clear leaded glass. 

And such lighting of lights in the thunderous roar 
The heart summoning courage to hand at the door; 
I grated it open on scents I knew well, 
The dry smell of damp rot, the hassocky smell. 
 

I think we can all imagine the taper gleaming through clear leaded glass as well as the dry smell of damp rot and hassocky smell.  

The sense of smell is one that often triggers our emotional memories, often brings us back to something in our past, and is often an evocative way of describing something we can all understand.  

Indeed if we conjure up in our minds the smell of freshly mown grass or polished wooden floors or even a Sunday roast coming out of the oven – it is sometimes as if we can smell those memories now.  

And of course, our gospel reading today is about smell. Mary’s gift to Jesus emits an aroma that saturates the house and the minds of everyone in it. 

Of course, the fragrance of the perfume, slightly erotically applied with Mary’s hair, strikes a contrast to Jesus’ death and burial. Our interpretation of the scene cannot ignore the gloom and Mary does not anoint Jesus as king or Messiah; she’s anointing a corpse. 

And if the beautiful scent and ugly crucifixion seem incongruent, then we are onto John’s strange logic whereby Jesus is lifted up onto a cross so that he might attract all to himself.  

This small vignette which happens just in advance of the triumph of Palm Sunday and Jesus’ prediction of his own death also contrasts lavish self-giving with critical stinginess. The exuberant giving of Mary with the critique of Judas, which although we understand points towards an yielding piety which cannot tolerate the wild and disturbing love exhibited by Mary.  

As one commentator puts it “Acts of true grace and love regularly get slandered as deviance.”Yet, we cannot ignore the fact that Jesus’ response,  

‘Leave her alone. She bought it so that she might keep it for the day of my burial. You always have the poor with you, but you do not always have me.’ Warns us today against mistaking discipline for discipleship. And permits us to embrace affection as part of a devotion to Jesus that is nothing less than the costly, precious gift of one’s whole self.  

Which, of course, in turn challenges us all.  

Lent, of course, is a time for us to ask difficult questions of ourselves. And it is only asking those questions that we discover ourselves and ultimately our God.  

How wildly and selflessly do we love Jesus?  

How passionately does the aroma of that perfume given by Mary persist in our nostrils today?  

Do you really live your life through the lens of the crucifixion and resurrection that was to follow?  
Amen

 

Next Week
Sunday 17th April
Easter Sunday

 

NOTICES

Coffee Morning for Ukraine
A huge thanks to the Fran Smith and the GENESIS team for organising and hosting the coffee morning
last Saturday (2nd April).
A well-attended event. The latest money count shows the
money raised is a truly amazing £1433.95 which will be donated
to the DEC Ukraine Humanitarian appeal.
Thank you to all for your support.

 

Weekly Benefice Newsletter
If you would like something added to the weekly newsletter that is relevant to the Benefice, please do let Claire know and we will do our best to include it the following week.
All requests by 4pm on Thursday please

Food Banks at the East of England Co-op
Foodbanks provide a valuable service to those in need in our communities. The Aldeburgh Co-op and Solar in Leiston are doing a grand job in collecting food donations, which are collected regularly and distributed. So please look out for the various collection baskets.

 

Message from Father Tony
We shall be having our annual ‘Seven Last Words’ on Monday 11th at 7pm, at Our Lady and St Peter, Aldeburgh, with music by Haydn and meditations by Cardinal Basil Hume.
There will be a retiring collection for the Disasters Emergency Committee Ukrainian Humanitarian Appeal

✞ Pilgrims Together on Wednesdays ✞
The Pilgrims worship together every Wednesday.
You are all more than welcome to join them via Zoom.  
The worship starts at 6.30pm (Zoom call opens from 6.10pm) and the call is then left open after the worship time for people to catch up.   People are welcome to email pilgrimstogether473@gmail.com 
to receive a copy or be added to our mailing list, or for the Zoom links.

Sunday 10th April Good News Breakfast Faith Cafe at the Parrot is open from 9.30 – 10.30.

Friday 22nd April F2F Pilgrims 6.30pm Aldeburgh Parish Hall Celtic Worship followed by a time of fellowship

Benefice Newsletter for Sunday 3rd April – Fifth Sunday of Lent/Passiontide


A Prayer for Ukraine
God of peace and justice,
We pray for the people of Ukraine today.
We pray for peace and the laying down of weapons.
We pray for those who fear for tomorrow,
that your Spirit of comfort would draw near to them.
We pray for those with power over war or peace,
for wisdom, discernment, and compassion to guide their decisions.
Above all, we pray for all your precious children, at risk and in fear,
that you would hold and protect them.
We pray in the name of Jesus, the Prince of Peace.
Amen

Archbishop Justin Welby, Archbishop Stephen Cottrell

DEC Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal – World Vision UK


A message from Bishop Martin
“The crisis in Ukraine is creating a humanitarian catastrophe, as all of us can see from the daily news reports.  Bishop Mike and I are calling on all the parishes and congregations of the Diocese this Lent to raise funds through collections, individual gifts, events, and activities, to respond to the terrible situation the people of Ukraine are facing – both in the country and as refugees.

We are very grateful to be in partnership with World Vision who will receive our donations and handle the gift aid.

Be assured that every pound goes directly to those in need. World Vision is also part of the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC), whose appeal is supported by the UK Government.

We ask you to be as generous as possible, and to continue to pray fervently for the end of the military operation and for peace.

With prayers for you, and for the children and families affected by the conflict in Ukraine.”

Bishop Martin

How your donation helps

The funds you donate to this emergency appeal will support emergency response for displaced children and families in Ukraine and neighbouring countries. We will use donations in Ukraine through partners when it is possible. If this is not possible or in the unlikely event we receive more donations than we need for this emergency, the donations will be used to help displaced and refugee populations elsewhere around the world.

content.wvunited.org

You can donate by visiting the World Vision UK website here:

https://content.wvunited.org/en-gb/emergencies/ukraine-crisis-eds-ips-appeal/#donate

Aldeburgh Parish Church has pre-labelled
Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal gift envelopes into which you can put your donation, and then place into one of the donation boxes, or hand to the churchwarden,
or the treasurer

Services this Sunday for The Alde Sandlings Benefice

Aldeburgh

8.00am

10.30am

Holy Communion

Service of the Word

Aldringham

11.00am

Holy Communion

Knodishall

9.00am

Holy Communion

Collect
Most merciful God, who by the death and resurrection of your
Son Jesus Christ delivered and saved the world:
grant that by faith in him who suffered on the cross
we may triumph in the power of his victory;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.

First Reading
Isaiah 43.16-21
Thus says the Lord, who makes a way in the sea,
a path in the mighty waters, who brings out chariot and horse,
army and warrior; they lie down, they cannot rise,they are extinguished, quenched like a wick: Do not remember the former things, or consider the things of old. I am about to do a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it? I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert. The wild animals will honour me, the jackals and the ostriches;
for I give water in the wilderness, rivers in the desert,
to give drink to my chosen people, the people whom I formed
for myself so that they might declare my praise. 

Second Reading
Philippians 3.4b-14
Even though I, too, have reason for confidence in the flesh. If anyone else has reason to be confident in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, a member of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew born of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless. Yet whatever gains I had, these I have come to regard as loss because of Christ. More than that, I regard everything as loss because of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things, and I regard them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but one that comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God based on faith. I want to know Christ and the power of his resurrection and the sharing of his sufferings by becoming like him in his death, if somehow I may attain the resurrection from the dead. Not that I have already obtained this or have already reached the goal; but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own. Beloved, I do not consider that I have made it my own; but this one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, I press on towards the goal for the prize of the heavenly call of God in Christ Jesus.

Gospel Reading
John 12.1-8
Six days before the Passover Jesus came to Bethany, the home of Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead. There they gave a dinner for him. Martha served, and Lazarus was one of those at the table with him. Mary took a pound of costly perfume made of pure nard, anointed Jesus’ feet, and wiped them with her hair. The house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume. But Judas Iscariot, one of his disciples (the one who was about to betray him), said, ‘Why was this perfume not sold for three hundred denarii and the money given to the poor?’ (He said this not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief; he kept the common purse and used to steal what was put into it.) Jesus said, ‘Leave her alone. She bought it so that she might keep it for the day of my burial. You always have the poor with you, but you do not always have me.’

Post Communion
Lord Jesus Christ, you have taught us
that what we do for the least of our brothers and sisters
we do also for you: give us the will to be the servant of others
as you were the servant of all, and gave up your life and died for us,
but are alive and reign, now and for ever.

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Sermon preached by The Revd James Marston at
Friston 27th March 2022

May I speak in the name of the living God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.  

“and a sword will pierce your own soul too.” 

We all know the story that Mary, mother of Jesus, finds herself a key player.  We know that as Jesus takes on the mantle of his ministry Mary is never far away, and, as the story begins to climax, and her son faces those set against him in Jerusalem Mary is a witness to it all.   

The piercing of the sword to which Simeon refers – is the sorrow of Mary as she watches her son humiliated, shamed, and executed on the cross. Even in this moment of blessing there is mention of pain to come for Mary; “and a sword will pierce your own soul too.” 

Indeed, I am not sure how Mary will have taken that, celebrating the joy of her son’s birth, to be told that all will not be good news. 

And in a way this is what we are having to grapple with at this time; that whilst knowing the joy of the Christian faith, the passion with which we can experience God through communal worship, the fun spent with our friends and family, the happiness of community, we have to live with an underlying pandemic anxiety, fears about war and conflict, as well as the worries of our village community about the future.  

We have to hold the joy of our faith and the concerns of life in balance, to see the darker things of life through the lens of faith. And this is no easy task.  

Today is Mother’s Day, a day now conflated with Mothering Sunday, a day during which traditionally people would return to worship at their mother church. A time of spiritual homecoming, that has been somewhat forgotten among the celebrations of the slightly more commercial Mother’s Day.  

To be honest, although I’m seeing my own mother later today, I’m always slightly uncomfortable about Mother’s Day – for some it is a day of pain and discomfort. And as Christians, we must hold them in our thoughts too. Indeed, I can’t help thinking of a friend of mine who would have dearly loved to have been a mother – and I think about her too today. And it is fair today that not everyone has good memories of their mothers either.  

Yet this is a day when we do celebrate all who have and do provide motherly care. And for that reason, we can give thanks.  

Our Gospel reading also reminds us that loving and caring in this way is a sacrifice of self-giving. A vocation to which many of us are called and something I know we try hard not to forget in our own church community here in Friston.  

So, in this time of Lent – as we aim to draw closer to God and examine our own faith and failings – I would urge you this week to remember that amid the bad news and difficulties we face there is joy and gratitude too and that Mary, who experienced sorrow and pain is remembered and venerated because she always points towards Jesus and therefore to hope.  

Let us continue in our journey of faith together and hold on to the hope of the risen Christ, born of Mary and revealed by the whole communion of saints.  

Happy Mother’s Day and however you are feeling and whatever you do have a happy and hope filled Sunday. 
Amen

Next Week
Sunday 10th April
Palm Sunday

 

 

NOTICES

Church of England Lent Reflections and
Diocese Weekly Newsletters
You might be interested to receive the daily Lent reflections from the Church of England. Here is the link to sign up to their email reflections

https://www.churchofengland.org/our-faith/what-we-believe/
lent-holy-week-and-easter/livelent-embracing-justice-our-lent-reflections

To keep up with weekly news from our Diocese you can sign up to receive the weekly newsletters here:
https://cofesuffolk.org/
subscribe-to-our-newsletters

✟ Church of England and Diocese Online Worship

There are many online services you can view from the Church of England and our cathedral. Here are some links below.

Church of England website

https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-and-worship/
church-online/weekly-online-services

Church of England Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/
thechurchofengland/

Church of England YouTube channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel
/UCLecK8GovYoaYzIgyOElKZg

St Edmundsbury Cathedral Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/
stedscathedral

 

✞ Lent Sessions ✞ – UPDATE
Will take place in the vestry of Aldeburgh church and in the home of Jill Brown, who has kindly offered to host an evening session through the Lenten period.
The dates and times are as follows:
The lent course, usually held on Wednesdays in the vestry at Aldeburgh church, will instead be held at
Revd James home at 11am on Wednesday April 6.
This is due to a funeral in the church.

The address is The Rectory, Aldeburgh Road, Friston, IP17 1NP

Thursdays 7pm, Onemana, Alde House Drive, Aldeburgh, IP15 5EE hosted by Jill Brown – beginning on March 3

Weekly Benefice Newsletter

If you would like something added to the weekly newsletter that is relevant to the Benefice, please do let Claire know and we will do our best to include it the following week.

All requests by 4pm on Thursday please

Food Banks at the East of England Co-op

Foodbanks provide a valuable service to those in need in our communities. The Aldeburgh Co-op and Solar in Leiston are doing a grand job in collecting food donations, which are collected regularly and distributed. So please look out for the various collection baskets.

Pilgrims Together on Wednesdays

The Pilgrims worship together every Wednesday.
You are all more than welcome to join them via Zoom.  
The worship starts at 6.30pm (Zoom call opens from 6.10pm) and the call is then left open after the worship time for people to catch up.   People are welcome to email pilgrimstogether473@gmail.com 
to receive a copy, added to our mailing list or for any of the zoom links.

Lunchtime Concert at Aldeburgh Parish Church

Monday 4th April at 12 noon

Following the huge success of Nadia’s concert with us in October, we welcome Nadia’s and friends, to raise more money for Save the Children.

ROBIN SOLDAN – FLUTE

NATHANIEL HARRISON – BASSOON

NADIA LASSERSON – PIANO

Trios by Bach, Beethoven & Donizetti

Admission free- a retiring collection for Save the Children

Save the Children - Community Information Centre

All welcome

Benefice Newsletter for Sunday 27th March – Fourth Sunday of Lent/Mothering Sunday


A Prayer for Ukraine
God of peace and justice,
We pray for the people of Ukraine today.
We pray for peace and the laying down of weapons.
We pray for those who fear for tomorrow,
that your Spirit of comfort would draw near to them.
We pray for those with power over war or peace,
for wisdom, discernment, and compassion to guide their decisions.
Above all, we pray for all your precious children, at risk and in fear,
that you would hold and protect them.
We pray in the name of Jesus, the Prince of Peace.
Amen.
Archbishop Justin Welby, Archbishop Stephen Cottrell

DEC Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal – World Vision UK

A message from Bishop Martin
“The crisis in Ukraine is creating a humanitarian catastrophe, as all of us can see from the daily news reports.  Bishop Mike and I are calling on all the parishes and congregations of the Diocese this Lent to raise funds through collections, individual gifts, events, and activities, to respond to the terrible situation the people of Ukraine are facing – both in the country and as refugees.

We are very grateful to be in partnership with World Vision who will receive our donations and handle the gift aid.

Be assured that every pound goes directly to those in need. World Vision is also part of the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC), whose appeal is supported by the UK Government.

We ask you to be as generous as possible, and to continue to pray fervently for the end of the military operation and for peace.

With prayers for you, and for the children and families affected by the conflict in Ukraine.”

Bishop Martin

How your donation helps

The funds you donate to this emergency appeal will support emergency response for displaced children and families in Ukraine and neighbouring countries. We will use donations in Ukraine through partners when it is possible. If this is not possible or in the unlikely event we receive more donations than we need for this emergency, the donations will be used to help displaced and refugee populations elsewhere around the world.

content.wvunited.org

You can donate by visiting the World Vision UK website here:

https://content.wvunited.org/en-gb/emergencies/ukraine-crisis-eds-ips-appeal/#donate

Aldeburgh Parish Church has pre-labelled
Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal gift envelopes into which you can put your donation, and then place into one of the donation boxes, or hand to the churchwarden,
or the treasurer

Services this Sunday for The Alde Sandlings Benefice

Aldeburgh

10.30am

6.00pm

Service of the Word

Evening Prayer

Aldringham

11.00am

Service of the Word

Friston

9.00am

Morning Prayer

Knodishall

9.00am

Morning Prayer

Next Week
Sunday 3rd April
Fifth Sunday of Lent

Collect
God of compassion, whose Son Jesus Christ, the child of Mary,
shared the life of a home in Nazareth, and on the cross drew the whole human family to himself: strengthen us in our daily living that in joy and in sorrow we may know the power of your presence to bind together and to heal; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.


First Reading
Exodus 2.1-10
Now a man from the house of Levi went and married a Levite woman. The woman conceived and bore a son; and when she saw that he was a fine baby, she hid him for three months. When she could hide him no longer she got a papyrus basket for him, and plastered it with bitumen and pitch; she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds on the bank of the river. His sister stood at a distance, to see what would happen to him. The daughter of Pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, while her attendants walked beside the river. She saw the basket among the reeds and sent her maid to bring it. When she opened it, she saw the child. He was crying, and she took pity on him. ‘This must be one of the Hebrews’ children,’ she said. Then his sister said to Pharaoh’s daughter, ‘Shall I go and get you a nurse from the Hebrew women to nurse the child for you?’ Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, ‘Yes.’ So the girl went and called the child’s mother. Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, ‘Take this child and nurse it for me, and I will give you your wages.’ So the woman took the child and nursed it. When the child grew up, she brought him to Pharaoh’s daughter, and she took him as her son. She named him Moses, ‘because’, she said, ‘I drew him out of the water.’

Second Reading
2 Corinthians 1.3-7
Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and the God of all consolation, who consoles us in all our affliction, so that we may be able to console those who are in any affliction with the consolation with which we ourselves are consoled by God. For just as the sufferings of Christ are abundant for us, so also our consolation is abundant through Christ. If we are being afflicted, it is for your consolation and salvation; if we are being consoled, it is for your consolation, which you experience when you patiently endure the same sufferings that we are also suffering. Our hope for you is unshaken; for we know that as you share in our sufferings, so also you share in our consolation.

Gospel Reading
Luke 2.33-35
And the child’s father and mother were amazed at what was being said about him. Then Simeon blessed them and said to his mother Mary, ‘This child is destined for the falling and the rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be opposed so that the inner thoughts of many will be revealed—and a sword will pierce your own soul too.’

Post Communion
Loving God, as a mother feeds her children at the breast
you feed us in this sacrament with the food and drink of eternal life:
help us who have tasted your goodness
to grow in grace within the household of faith;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

 

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Sermon preached by The Very Revd Christopher Lewis at
Aldringham 20th March 2022

Isaiah 55.1-9

The first reading has some of the most beautiful and moving passages in the Bible. It speaks of the free gift of God’s grace: ‘Come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without price.’ And then later in the passage, there is reference to the everlasting covenant which God offers to his people, so they should ‘Seek the Lord while he may be found’ and ‘call upon him while he is near’. There is the promise that God will pardon the wicked when they return to Him, with God explaining that He acts differently from us: ‘For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord’.

There is, however, a test and a challenge here. Are we able to receive a free gift? It is a Lent test and requires a very great degree of clearing of the mind: not mine clearance as in land-mines, but mind clearance, which may be just about as difficult.

We have to re-educate ourselves. You know all that stuff about there being ‘no free lunches’ which we learned on our mother’s (probably actually our father’s) knee. And you know all that saying about people only appreciating what they pay for. Someone said to me the other day that we really ought to charge people to come to church….then they’d appreciate it.

You know those letters you throw away: Dear Rev Lewis, congratulations on having got to the last stage in the competition to win a ….Ford Tantrum….imagine yourself, with your partner beside you, purring along. Or that commercial operation, the ‘postcode lottery’ with its £10 per month subscription, although it is at least true that a third of that goes to charities.

Then there are the presents or the good turns that you receive, and which send you into a terrible anxiety about how on earth you will repay them, for repay them you feel you must. Otherwise, you will feel patronised or indebted and that would be terrible.

No, for this is the test. Unlike the lunches and the offers and the presents, this gift is free. And so: are you able to believe the older saying which came long before all the ‘free lunch’ business, that ‘the best things in life are free’. So, to the Lent test – not a test in the sense of an exam, but rather in the sense of a struggle: is it possible to think in God’s way and for us to receive free gifts without embarrassment, without hurt pride. ‘Come buy wine and milk without money’.

That, I think, is why Jesus uses children as examples to us all….and one reason why he commends the people whom society rejects. Why? Because they are not fussed about receiving free gifts. When I was a Vicar in a parish in Lincolnshire, homeless men used to come to our door asking for sandwiches and more: marmite sandwiches, jam – anything would do, and our children looked on with fascination and chatted.

On the subject of Vicars, there was a once a Vicar who was in the middle of the eucharist service in his church and he got up to read the Gospel. It was to have been from St Luke’s Gospel where Jesus says (Lk 6;27): ‘Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you…’ But he could not say it; he stopped in the middle: ‘bless those who….’ He had to sit down. Then a voice came from the back which said ‘Don’t worry Vicar; I find it impossible to live by it too’. And instead of the Gospel reading and the

sermon, they had a spontaneous discussion about the wonder of the Christian faith: bless those who curse you. So, once they had lost their pride, they could discuss God’s help, usually called his grace.

It is a Lent test to realise that God is not just another person only kind-of infinite. When Jesus told the parable of the workers in the vineyard – the one where the people all got the same wage, even when they started working just before the end of the day – he realised that it would be hard for people to get the point. God’s ways are different. He is not fair at all. For his love goes out to people whoever they are and it is free. It is ‘amazing grace’. And, in a sense, we are not required to pay him back. Except that he longs for us to show the same kind of unreasonable love to him and to others.

We are in the middle of an international crisis during which it is right to reach out to God and pray for the Ukrainians and indeed for the Russians. We have to recognize that many very brave Russians demonstrate against the war, interrupt a news bulletin, or are just horrified and leave their country. But we also realize that the Russian Orthodox Church (again with some exceptions) is backing the war in the form of its Patriarch Kirill – no doubt in part because the Ukraine has formed its own breakaway Orthodox Church, but also because he backs Putin, in Putin’s demands for Ukrainian surrender. Put differently, Patriarch Kirill could be labelled very clearly as among the enemy.

How then do we, as it were, forward God’s free gift of love? Remember Jesus’ saying ‘Love your enemies’ and the voice from the back of the church which said ‘Don’t worry Vicar; I find it impossible to live by too’. What God in Jesus brought was a whole new way of living: a free gift which is also a challenge. Force has to be used in some circumstances as it had to be used against Hitler. The message, however, must mean that we treat others with understanding and do not bear grudges. It did real harm to hate Germans in the 1920’s and it did no good to hate them in the 1950’s.

Jesus words were part of his bringing in a whole new kind of world: the kingdom of God on its way to being realized on earth. That led to his life-giving healing to those who were suffering and outcast, and then his death at the hands of the enemy namely the religious and political elite of his day. Lent is an appropriate time during which to reflect on that life and to pray that we may follow it as best we can. We do not look ahead too quickly to Easter as if it solves all problems. We concentrate on God’s free gift of love and grace now.
Amen

NOTICES

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Church of England Lent Reflections and
Diocese Weekly Newsletters

You might be interested to receive the daily Lent reflections from the Church of England. Here is the link to sign up to their email reflections

https://www.churchofengland.org/our-faith/what-we-believe
/lent-holy-week-and-easter/livelent-embracing-justice-our-lent-reflections

To keep up with weekly news from our Diocese you can sign up to receive the weekly newsletters here:
https://cofesuffolk.org/
subscribe-to-our-newsletters

Church of England and Diocese Online Worship

There are many online services you can view from the Church of England and our cathedral. Here are some links below.

Church of England website

https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-and-worship/
church-online/weekly-online-services

Church of England Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/
thechurchofengland/

Church of England YouTube channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel/
UCLecK8GovYoaYzIgyOElKZg

St Edmundsbury Cathedral Facebook Page
https://www.facebook.com/stedscathedral

 

Lent Sessions
Will take place in the vestry of Aldeburgh church and in the home of Jill Brown, who has kindly offered to host an evening session through the Lenten period.
The dates and times are as follows:
Wednesday’s 11am, Aldeburgh church Vestry –
hosted by Rev’d James – beginning on March 2
Thursdays 7pm, Onemana, Alde House Drive, Aldeburgh, IP15 5EE hosted by Jill Brown – beginning on March 3

 

Weekly Benefice Newsletter

If you would like something added to the weekly newsletter that is relevant to the Benefice, please do let Claire know and we will do our best to include it the following week.

All requests by 4pm on Thursday please

Food Banks at the East of England Co-op

Foodbanks provide a valuable service to those in need in our communities. The Aldeburgh Co-op and Solar in Leiston are doing a grand job in collecting food donations, which are collected regularly and distributed. So please look out for the various collection baskets.

The Trussel Trust Organisation

Food banks in our network have seen an increase in the number of food parcels given out over the last year due to Coronavirus, so any donations are much appreciated. You can find out which items your local food bank is most in need of by entering your postcode here – https://www.trusselltrust.org/give-food/

Pilgrims Together on Wednesdays

The Pilgrims worship together every Wednesday.
You are all more than welcome to join them via Zoom.  
The worship starts at 6.30pm (Zoom call opens from 6.10pm) and the call is then left open after the worship time for people to catch up.   People are welcome to email pilgrimstogether473@gmail.com 
to receive a copy, added to our mailing list or for the Zoom links .

Saturday 2nd April Pilgrim Community Breakfast and Ramble starting at the Parrot Pub at 9.30am for Breakfast.

As before, a delicious breakfast bap and coffee / tea combo for £5 is on offer at the Parrot…definitely not to be missed, before we head out to explore local paths. Come just for breakfast and a catch-up with folk, come for just the ramble or come and enjoy both. (You don’t need to book in advance, you can decide on the morning.) To help with timing, if coming only to ramble then we generally head from The Parrot around 10.30am. Please do invite friends along.

Lunchtime Concert at Aldeburgh Parish Church

Monday 4th April at 12 noon

Following the huge success of Nadia’s concert with us in October, we welcome Nadia’s and friends, to raise more money for Save the Children.

ROBIN SOLDAN – FLUTE

NATHANIEL HARRISON – BASSOON

NADIA LASSERSON – PIANO

Trios by Bach, Beethoven & Donizetti

Admission free- a retiring collection for Save the Children

Save the Children - Community Information Centre

All welcome

Benefice Newsletter for Sunday 20th March – Third Sunday of Lent


A Prayer for Ukraine

God of peace and justice,
We pray for the people of Ukraine today.
We pray for peace and the laying down of weapons.
We pray for those who fear for tomorrow,
that your Spirit of comfort would draw near to them.
We pray for those with power over war or peace,
for wisdom, discernment, and compassion to guide their decisions.
Above all, we pray for all your precious children, at risk and in fear,
that you would hold and protect them.
We pray in the name of Jesus, the Prince of Peace.
Amen.


Archbishop Justin Welby, Archbishop Stephen Cottrell

DEC Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal – World Vision UK

A message from Bishop Martin
“The crisis in Ukraine is creating a humanitarian catastrophe, as all of us can see from the daily news reports.  Bishop Mike and I are calling on all the parishes and congregations of the Diocese this Lent to raise funds through collections, individual gifts, events, and activities, to respond to the terrible situation the people of Ukraine are facing – both in the country and as refugees.

We are very grateful to be in partnership with World Vision who will receive our donations and handle the gift aid.

Be assured that every pound goes directly to those in need. World Vision is also part of the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC), whose appeal is supported by the UK Government.

We ask you to be as generous as possible, and to continue to pray fervently for the end of the military operation and for peace.

With prayers for you, and for the children and families affected by the conflict in Ukraine.”

Bishop Martin

How your donation helps

The funds you donate to this emergency appeal will support emergency response for displaced children and families in Ukraine and neighbouring countries. We will use donations in Ukraine through partners when it is possible. If this is not possible or in the unlikely event we receive more donations than we need for this emergency, the donations will be used to help displaced and refugee populations elsewhere around the world.

content.wvunited.org

You can donate by visiting the World Vision UK website here:

https://content.wvunited.org/en-gb/emergencies/ukraine-crisis-eds-ips-appeal/#donate

Aldeburgh Parish Church has pre-labelled
Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal gift envelopes into which you can put your donation, and then place into one of the donation boxes, or hand to the churchwarden,
or the treasurer

SUPPLIES TO UKRAINE

David Jenkins of Thorpeness has been volunteering his time at
Anchor Freights warehouse in Ipswich, where they are sorting and distributing supplies to Ukraine.

At this time due to Customs restrictions food cannot be accepted but items that would be welcomed are: –

Toiletries

Nappies

Woman’s sanitary items

Warm clothing

Power Banks

Bedding

Sleeping bags

First Aid items

Wipes

Torches

David has very kindly said that he is more than happy for donations to be delivered to his home address for onward transmission. 
Please contact admin@aldeburghparishchurch.org.uk if you would like to donate any items.

 

Services this Sunday for The Alde Sandlings Benefice

Aldeburgh

8.00am

10.30am

Holy Communion

Morning Prayer

Aldringham

11.00am

Holy Communion

Knodishall

9.00am

Holy Communion

Next Week 
Sunday 27th March
Fourth Sunday of Lent/Mothering Sunday

 

Collect
Almighty God,
whose most dear Son went not up to joy but first he suffered pain,
and entered not into glory before he was crucified:
mercifully grant that we, walking in the way of the cross,
may find it none other than the way of life and peace;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.

 

First Reading
Isaiah 55.1-9
Ho, everyone who thirsts, come to the waters;
and you that have no money, come, buy and eat!
Come, buy wine and milk without money and without price. 
Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread,
and your labour for that which does not satisfy?
Listen carefully to me, and eat what is good, and delight yourselves
in rich food. Incline your ear, and come to me; listen, so that you
may live. I will make with you an everlasting covenant, my steadfast, sure love for David.  See, I made him a witness to the peoples, a leader and commander for the peoples. See, you shall call nations that you do not know, and nations that do not know you shall run to you, because of the Lord your God, the Holy One of Israel, for he has glorified you.  Seek the Lord while he may be found, call upon him while he is near; let the wicked forsake their way, and the unrighteous their thoughts; let them return to the Lord, that he may have mercy on them, and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon. For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord.  For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts. 

Second Reading
1 Corinthians 10.1-13
I do not want you to be unaware, brothers and sisters, that our ancestors were all under the cloud, and all passed through the sea, and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea, and all ate the same spiritual food, and all drank the same spiritual drink. For they drank from the spiritual rock that followed them, and the rock was Christ. Nevertheless, God was not pleased with most of them, and they were struck down in the wilderness. Now these things occurred as examples for us, so that we might not desire evil as they did. Do not become idolaters as some of them did; as it is written, ‘The people sat down to eat and drink, and they rose up to play.’ We must not indulge in sexual immorality as some of them did, and twenty-three thousand fell in a single day. We must not put Christ to the test, as some of them did, and were destroyed by serpents. And do not complain as some of them did, and were destroyed by the destroyer. These things happened to them to serve as an example, and they were written down to instruct us, on whom the ends of the ages have come. So if you think you are standing, watch out that you do not fall. No testing has overtaken you that is not common to everyone. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tested beyond your strength, but with the testing he will also provide the way out so that you may be able to endure it.

Gospel Reading
Luke 13.1-9
At that very time there were some present who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. He asked them, ‘Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were worse sinners than all other Galileans? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish as they did. Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did.’ Then he told this parable: ‘A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. So he said to the gardener, “See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?” He replied, “Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig round it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.” ’

Post Communion
Merciful Lord, grant your people grace to withstand
the temptations of the world, the flesh and the devil,
and with pure hearts and minds to follow you, the only God;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

 

Sermon preached by The Very Revd Christopher Lewis at
Aldeburgh 13th March 2022

Luke 13: 31-end

These are hard times, made more challenging, in a way, by the many types of media. We rightly feel strongly for the Ukrainians in their plight. And we are critical of the Russians, although one cannot help noticing that many Russians are being arrested every day for demonstrating against the attacks and some are leaving their country.

It was in Peterborough cathedral many years ago that an arsonist stacked plastic chairs and set light to them, leading to a toxic fire, the smoke from which did vast damage to the contents of that beautiful building. Next day, there was a deputation with a cheque towards the restoration. It was from the local mosque which had taken up a large collection.

My text is just a few words from the second reading today: ‘Some Pharisees came and said to Jesus…’ In spite of everything said about Pharisees, these were friendly ones, and they gave a warning about Herod’s intention to kill Jesus. Today’s Gospel from St Luke continues with Jesus’ lament over Jerusalem, the city which kills its prophets and stones those sent to it. It is the city which Jesus loves… poetically: ‘How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings’. Jesus knows that he will set his face to Jerusalem and die there.

What were the Pharisees up to? Predictably, commentators (you know what experts are like) vary in their interpretation. Some reckon that the Pharisees were indeed plain friendly and giving a warning. After all, when Jesus was young, his teachers would have been Pharisees. Then different experts say that the Pharisees were not what they seemed to be; maybe they were in league with Herod, bent on the sinister purpose of diverting Jesus from his course.

Back to the Peterborough Muslims. Were they giving a donation because they felt affection for the cathedral and the people who worshipped there – showing sorrow for the sacrilege which had happened to a holy place? Or did they have some devious purpose, deceiving the enemy into thinking they were on his side, in order to subvert the Christian faith?

Back to the Pharisees. It appears that they were a mixed bunch. They certainly tended to be legalistic, hence the use of the term ‘pharisee’ today to describe people who are self-righteous and over-formal. They had their traditions, but were much more flexible than some of the other groups at the time, Sadducees to name but one. Pharisees were more popular, more democratic, in a sense more liberal. Jesus at times pointed to their hypocrisy and legalism (along with the scribes) but then on the other hand, the Pharisees in a sense produced St Paul and Paul used his Pharisee origins to strengthen his credentials with the Jews. Paul does not seem to have thought that at all odd when he was preaching a Gospel of resurrection. After all, Pharisees believed in resurrection from the dead.

The social psychologists have a word for how we choose and treat particular groups of people; they call it reification. We generalise and reify, especially with collections of people we don’t like. Newspapers do it every day, in fact you could almost say that reification is their stock- in-trade. A more serious example is the crazy conspiracy theorists which have particular enemies. I don’t seem able to avoid a fascination for the American conspiracy movement QAnon, for they find original ways to believe the unbelievable. They reckon that their government, their media, and their financial world are all controlled by Satan-worshipping paedophiles. QAnon is an anti-semitic internet-supported phenomenon and, what is more, apparently it is growing. I find it hard to believe that 17% of Americans are QAnon believers, some of them right-wing Christians and Trump supporters.

People like Joseph McCarthy used to think that there were Communists out there somewhere, a great block of people who were the enemy. They went away or somehow disintegrated, but we quickly replaced them with terrorists and Islamists. Of course, people who bomb and destroy do exist; there are people out there who are bent on harm, and we must oppose them, much as we do Putin. But the reification happens when they are treated as a great block of people, part perhaps of an axis of evil, and the reification continues with the belief that once they are somehow eliminated, all will be well. Actually they are probably human beings who have got themselves into (or found themselves in) a particular context and then do evil things, like the gangs in West Side Story. Maybe we are creating them by the policies we pursue…and then fighting them by means of more of the same policies.

The Christian asks the question: How did Jesus behave? How, for example, did he behave towards the Pharisees? He certainly called them some rude things: whitewashed tombs and broods of vipers; blind guides. But in the Gospels the things he said were hardly the main part, for the thrust of the Gospel was action, opposing suffering and preaching love for all. Jesus turned his face to Jerusalem and faced the consequences of doing that, rather than having a quiet life in Galilee railing at his enemies.

So Jesus’ method, if one may call it that, was an active kind of love: one which stayed with the enemy, rather than distancing itself from the opposition or going separate ways. Indeed, Jesus’ way meant entering enemy-occupied territory and drawing the sting of aggression by loving behaviour. His life is not only a matter of argument and counter argument, but more a matter of being alongside friend and foe, knowing that such a move will lead to suffering……. and thereby providing a wholly new context in which life can take place: ‘Love your enemies’ (Luke 6;27). For Jesus, it led to suffering and death…..and the victory which followed was not at all of the expected kind.

Significantly, the victory did not exactly lead to the defeat of the enemy, at least in the obvious sense. Pharisees and many others no doubt went on in their normal way, until they were killed by the occupying power or died in their beds. The resurrection was theologically a defeat for the devil and all his works, but in the more humdrum world of everyday life in Jerusalem, life

went on. What changed was that Jesus had provided a whole new world, a new kind of life which was of a different order to the old life. So the boring old battle lines of reification, drawn up over this issue or that – Pharisees or Sadducees – did not really lead to victory or to defeat. They were largely irrelevant. New ground was found. The action moved elsewhere and the issues, or whatever you wish to call them, were to be seen in the light of the teaching and practice of the crucified and risen Lord. Love was to be active in a new way. The kingdom had come and was also yet to come.

The reifications which we latch onto are often deeply misleading. Of course, that does not mean that we do not work against suffering and evil, as Jesus did throughout his time on earth. There is a justification for supporting the use of force in ‘just policies’ to protect people or nations, or in a ‘just war’ like one which had to be fought against Hitler. Yet ‘love your enemies’ is an overriding principle which in part means: only do hard things to a minimum and never bear grudges. It did no good to hate Germans in the 1950’s. The world is full of human beings and their activities – to be understood and loved. Even the Pharisees were not all that they seemed to be.

Amen

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Church of England Lent Reflections and
Diocese Weekly Newsletters

You might be interested to receive the daily Lent reflections from the Church of England. Here is the link to sign up to their email reflections

https://www.churchofengland.org/our-faith/what-we-believe/lent-holy-week-and-easter/livelent-embracing-justice-our-lent-reflections

To keep up with weekly news from our Diocese you can sign up to receive the weekly newsletters here:
https://cofesuffolk.org/subscribe-to-our-newsletters

Church of England and Diocese Online Worship

There are many online services you can view from the Church of England and our cathedral. Here are some links below.

Church of England website

https://www.churchofengland.org/
prayer-and-worship/church-online/weekly-online-services

Church of England Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/
thechurchofengland/

Church of England YouTube channel

https://www.youtube.com/
channel/UCLecK8GovYoaYzIgyOElKZg

St Edmundsbury Cathedral Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/
stedscathedral

 

Lent Sessions
Will take place in the vestry of Aldeburgh church and in the home of Jill Brown, who has kindly offered to host an evening session through the Lenten period.
The dates and times are as follows:
Wednesday’s 11am, Aldeburgh church Vestry –
hosted by Rev’d James – beginning on March 2
Thursdays 7pm, Onemana, Alde House Drive, Aldeburgh, IP15 5EE hosted by Jill Brown – beginning on March 3

Food Banks at the East of England Co-op

Foodbanks provide a valuable service to those in need in our communities. The Aldeburgh Co-op and Solar in Leiston are doing a grand job in collecting food donations, which are collected regularly and distributed. So please look out for the various collection baskets.

The Trussel Trust Organisation

Food banks in our network have seen an increase in the number of food parcels given out over the last year due to Coronavirus, so any donations are much appreciated. You can find out which items your local food bank is most in need of by entering your postcode here – https://www.trusselltrust.org/give-food/

 

Weekly Benefice Newsletter

If you would like something added to the weekly newsletter that is relevant to the Benefice, please do let Claire know and we will do our best to include it the following week.

All requests by 4pm on Thursday please

Pilgrims Together on Wednesdays

The Pilgrims worship together every Wednesday.
You are all more than welcome to join them via Zoom.  
The worship starts at 6.30pm (Zoom call opens from 6.10pm) and the call is then left open after the worship time for people to catch up.   People are welcome to email pilgrimstogether473@gmail.com 
to receive a copy or be added to our mailing list, and for Zoom links.

Saturday 2nd April Pilgrim Community Breakfast and Ramble starting at the Parrot Pub at 9.30am for Breakfast.

As before, a delicious breakfast bap and coffee / tea combo for £5 is on offer at the Parrot…definitely not to be missed, before we head out to explore local paths. Come just for breakfast and a catch-up with folk, come for just the ramble or come and enjoy both. (You don’t need to book in advance, you can decide on the morning.) To help with timing, if coming only to ramble then we generally head from The Parrot around 10.30am. Please do invite friends along.

A message from Adrian Brown –
Aldeburgh Church Treasurer

Would you like to donate to our Church?

We hugely rely on regular donations to enable us to open our doors daily for people to visit and worship in our beautiful church.  Can you help, but haven’t got the cash on you?  We now have a contactless

terminal next to the sidespeople handing out service booklets so donations may be made before or after a service, or why not sign up to the Parish Giving Scheme and donate as often as you want.  

Ask a Church warden or sidesperson for more information.  
We cannot thank you enough for your donations.

 

MOTHERING SUNDAY POSIES

We will be making posies on the 26th March from 10am in the vestry, for our Mothering Sunday Service at Aldeburgh. Do come along and help if you can spare the time.

If you can spare any greenery, please do leave it in the west porch before the 26th. Thank you

Lunchtime Concert at Aldeburgh Parish Church

Monday 4th April at 12 noon

Following the huge success of Nadia’s concert with us in October, we welcome Nadia’s and friends, to raise more money for Save the Children.

ROBIN SOLDAN – FLUTE

NATHANIEL HARRISON – BASSOON

NADIA LASSERSON – PIANO

Trios by Bach, Beethoven & Donizetti

Admission free- a retiring collection for Save the Children

Save the Children - Community Information Centre

All welcome

Benefice Newsletter for Sunday 13th March – Second Sunday of Lent


A Prayer for Ukraine
God of peace and justice,
We pray for the people of Ukraine today.
We pray for peace and the laying down of weapons.
We pray for those who fear for tomorrow,
that your Spirit of comfort would draw near to them.
We pray for those with power over war or peace,
for wisdom, discernment, and compassion to guide their decisions.
Above all, we pray for all your precious children, at risk and in fear,
that you would hold and protect them.
We pray in the name of Jesus, the Prince of Peace.
Amen.

Archbishop Justin Welby, Archbishop Stephen Cottrell

 

DEC Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal – World Vision UK


A message from Bishop Martin
“The crisis in Ukraine is creating a humanitarian catastrophe, as all of us can see from the daily news reports.  Bishop Mike and I are calling on all the parishes and congregations of the Diocese this Lent to raise funds through collections, individual gifts, events, and activities, to respond to the terrible situation the people of Ukraine are facing – both in the country and as refugees.

We are very grateful to be in partnership with World Vision who will receive our donations and handle the gift aid.

Be assured that every pound goes directly to those in need. World Vision is also part of the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC), whose appeal is supported by the UK Government.

We ask you to be as generous as possible, and to continue to pray fervently for the end of the military operation and for peace.

With prayers for you, and for the children and families affected by the conflict in Ukraine.”

Bishop Martin

How your donation helps

The funds you donate to this emergency appeal will support emergency response for displaced children and families in Ukraine and neighbouring countries. We will use donations in Ukraine through partners when it is possible. If this is not possible or in the unlikely event we receive more donations than we need for this emergency, the donations will be used to help displaced and refugee populations elsewhere around the world.

content.wvunited.org

You can donate by visiting the World Vision UK website here:

https://content.wvunited.org/en-gb/emergencies/ukraine-crisis-eds-ips-appeal/#donate

Aldeburgh Parish Church has pre-labelled
Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal gift envelopes into which you can put your donation, and then place into one of the donation boxes, or hand to the churchwarden,
or the treasurer

SUPPLIES TO UKRAINE
David Jenkins of Thorpeness has been volunteering his time at
Anchor Freights warehouse in Ipswich, where they are sorting and distributing supplies to Ukraine.

At this time due to Customs restrictions food cannot be accepted but items that would be welcomed are: –

Toiletries

Nappies

Woman’s sanitary items

Warm clothing

Power Banks

Bedding

Sleeping bags

First Aid items

Wipes

Torches

David has very kindly said that he is more than happy for donations to be delivered to his home address for onward transmission. 
Please contact admin@aldeburghparishchurch.org.uk if you would like to donate items.

 

Services this Sunday for The Alde Sandlings Benefice

Aldeburgh

10.30am

Holy Communion

Aldringham

11.00am

Service of the Word

Friston

9.00am

CANCELLED

Knodishall

9.00am

Morning Prayer

 

Collect
Almighty God, you show to those who are in error the light of your truth,
that they may return to the way of righteousness:
grant to all those who are admitted into the fellowship of Christ’s religion,
that they may reject those things that are contrary to their profession,
and follow all such things as are agreeable to the same;
through our Lord Jesus Christ, who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.

First Reading
Genesis 15.1-12, 17-18
After these things the word of the Lord came to Abram in a vision, ‘Do not be afraid, Abram, I am your shield; your reward shall be very great.’ But Abram said, ‘O Lord God, what will you give me, for I continue childless, and the heir of my house is Eliezer of Damascus?’ And Abram said, ‘You have given me no offspring, and so a slave born in my house is to be my heir.’ But the word of the Lord came to him, ‘This man shall not be your heir; no one but your very own issue shall be your heir.’ He brought him outside and said, ‘Look towards heaven and count the stars, if you are able to count them.’ Then he said to him, ‘So shall your descendants be.’  And he believed the Lord; and the Lord reckoned it to him as righteousness. Then he said to him, ‘I am the Lord who brought you from Ur of the Chaldeans, to give you this land to possess.’ But he said, ‘O Lord God, how am I to know that I shall possess it?’ He said to him, ‘Bring me a heifer three years old, a female goat three years old, a ram three years old, a turtle-dove, and a young pigeon.’ He brought him all these and cut them in two, laying each half over against the other; but he did not cut the birds in two. And when birds of prey came down on the carcasses, Abram drove them away. As the sun was going down, a deep sleep fell upon Abram, and a deep and terrifying darkness descended upon him. When the sun had gone down and it was dark, a smoking fire-pot and a flaming torch passed between these pieces. On that day the Lord made a covenant with Abram, saying, ‘To your descendants I give this land, from the river of Egypt to the great river, the river Euphrates’.

Second Reading
Philippians 3.17-4.1
Brothers and sisters, join in imitating me, and observe those who live according to the example you have in us.  For many live as enemies of the cross of Christ; I have often told you of them, and now I tell you even with tears. Their end is destruction; their god is the belly; and their glory is in their shame; their minds are set on earthly things. But our citizenship is in heaven, and it is from there that we are expecting a Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ. He will transform the body of our humiliation so that it may be conformed to the body of his glory, by the power that also enables him to make all things subject to himself. Therefore, my brothers and sisters, whom I love and long for, my joy and crown, stand firm in the Lord in this way, my beloved.

Gospel Reading
Luke 13.31-end
At that very hour some Pharisees came and said to him, ‘Get away from here, for Herod wants to kill you.’ He said to them, ‘Go and tell that fox for me, “Listen, I am casting out demons and performing cures today and tomorrow, and on the third day I finish my work. Yet today, tomorrow, and the next day I must be on my way, because it is impossible for a prophet to be killed away from Jerusalem.” Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! See, your house is left to you. And I tell you, you will not see me until the time comes when you say, “Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord.”

Post Communion
Almighty God, you see that we have no power of ourselves to help ourselves: keep us both outwardly in our bodies, and inwardly in our souls; that we may be defended from all adversities which may happen to the body, and from all evil thoughts which may assault and hurt the soul; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

 

Sermon preached by The Revd James Marston at
Knodishall 6th March 2022

Luke 4.1-13

May I speak in the name of the living God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

According to the website wiki.how to do anything, under coping with temptation it has the following recommendations.

Distract yourself with a healthier activity.

Tell yourself you’ll indulge your craving in 15 mins, then delay it longer.
Visualize yourself resisting the temptation to increase your resolve

All of these are, of course, and I speak as one who loves temptation, boring, dull and not much fun.

We all love to indulge ourselves, don’t we? Not only am I in an Odyssean battle with my attempts to stop smoking, I have a little blue sports car which I certainly don’t need but rather like the attention it draws.

Even our 18th century friend Canon Woodforde enjoyed the temptations of a fine table. On a day in Lent 1778 Woodforde spent the day fishing with friends before dining on stewed carp, a filet of veal and roasted ham followed by some mince pies and tarts, before spending the rest of the evening gambling and losing four schillings and six pence and not getting home until half past nine o’clock.

The next day, according to his diary, he brewed some strong beer and got his two large pigs “amazingly drunk” so much, so they were unable to walk for two days, and he was able to slit their ears without noticing.

An observation that made me wonder if Canon Woodforde ever had time to fit in doing the benefice rota let alone a PCC meeting.

Resisting the things, we like but aren’t always good for us; resisting temptation is, for all of us, something of a Sisyphean task.

And in today’s gospel reading even Jesus, the son of the most high God, has the same battle. Tempted in the wilderness by the devil with food, and by earthly power and glory, Jesus is human after all.

How Jesus deals with temptation shows us the way. He turns to God and the devil leaves him alone until another day.

Indeed, Jesus responds with quotations drawn from the Old Testament that show awareness of the true source of life and identity (he knows that life is more than food), his reliance on God (the one worthy of true worship and service), and his understanding of God’s character (not one to be tested)

Jesus’ responses are rooted in an underlying narrative that he is dependent on God rather than self for life, glory, and identity.

Lent is, of course, our time to turn to God. We use this time in our tradition to deepen our relationship with Him as we live through and echo the forty days of wilderness that Jesus endured.

Lent is heralded by Ash Wednesday, which we marked this week, in which we promise to turn away from sin and turn towards Christ. And Lent ends with Maundy Thursday when we remember the last supper and focus on the forgiveness and reconciliation of the Eucharist.

At this time of examination and deepening of our faith, my challenge to you is not to rely on yourself and your own means to resist the temptations and inducements that draw you away from God – whatever they may be – but to consciously try to rely just a little bit more on God.

Turn to Him in your wilderness, turn to Him when you need help to make the right decision, turn to Him in all things. Because therein lies the path to holiness we, as Christians and as followers of Jesus, are all compelled to seek.

Amen

Next Week
Sunday 20th March
Third Sunday of Lent

 

NOTICES

Church of England Lent Reflections and
Diocese Weekly Newsletters

You might be interested to receive the daily Lent reflections from the Church of England. Here is the link to sign up to their email reflections

https://www.churchofengland.org/our-faith/
what-we-believe/lent-holy-week-and-easter
/livelent-embracing-justice-our-lent-reflections

To keep up with weekly news from our Diocese you can sign up to receive the weekly newsletters here:
https://cofesuffolk.org/subscribe-to-our-newsletters

 

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MOTHERING SUNDAY POSIES

We will be making posies on the 26th March from 10am in the vestry, for our Mothering Sunday Service at Aldeburgh. Do come along and help if you can spare the time.
If you can spare any greenery, please do leave it in the west porch before the 26th. Thank you

Church of England and Diocese Online Worship 

There are many online services you can view from the Church of England and our cathedral. Here are some links below.

Church of England website

https://www.churchofengland.org/
prayer-and-worship/church-online/
weekly-online-services

Church of England Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/
thechurchofengland/

Church of England YouTube channel

https://www.youtube.com/

channel/UCLecK8GovYoaYzIgyOElKZg

St Edmundsbury Cathedral Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/
stedscathedral

Food Banks at the East of England Co-op

Foodbanks provide a valuable service to those in need in our communities. The Aldeburgh Co-op and Solar in Leiston are doing a grand job in collecting food donations, which are collected regularly and distributed. So please look out for the various collection baskets.

The Trussel Trust Organisation

Food banks in our network have seen an increase in the number of food parcels given out over the last year due to Coronavirus, so any donations are much appreciated. You can find out which items your local food bank is most in need of by entering your postcode here – https://www.trusselltrust.org/give-food/

 

Weekly Benefice Newsletter 

If you would like something added to the weekly newsletter that is relevant to the Benefice, please do let Claire know and we will do our best to include it the following week.

All requests by 4pm on Thursday please

Pilgrims Together on Wednesdays 

The Pilgrims worship together every Wednesday.
You are all more than welcome to join them via Zoom.  
The worship starts at 6.30pm (Zoom call opens from 6.10pm) and the call is then left open after the worship time for people to catch up.   People are welcome to email pilgrimstogether473@gmail.com 
to receive a copy or be added to our mailing list.

Friday 18th March 6.30pm Aldeburgh Parish Hall F2F Pilgrims

We will be gathering for f2f worship followed by a time of fellowship.  We are very excited, almost 2 years to the day (it was 4th March 2020 when we last gathered together inside).

Worship material will all be provided so there is nothing to print off.

We will place chairs a safe distance apart and the hall will be well ventilated.
Please do wear a mask if you feel more comfortable with that.

Following our time of worship, we will also have a time of sharing fellowship and food: You may bring your own plate of food for yourself. We will bring the usual bread cheese / jam fare should you wish to have a bite from that selection. Teas and coffees should you wish…

If you need a lift, please do say…that can be organised!

Lunchtime Concert at Aldeburgh Parish Church

Monday 4th April at 12 noon

Following the huge success of Nadia’s concert with us in October, we welcome Nadia’s and friends, to raise more money for Save the Children.

ROBIN SOLDAN – FLUTE

NATHANIEL HARRISON – BASSOON

NADIA LASSERSON – PIANO

Trios by Bach, Beethoven & Donizetti

Admission free- a retiring collection for Save the Children

Save the Children - Community Information Centre

All welcome

Aldeburgh Youth Club Returns

As we emerge from the Covid restrictions we have had to follow during the past two years, we look forward to a time when we can meet up again and get back to hobbies, activities, and clubs.  The first Monday would be May 9th, due to the various Bank Holidays. We will be meeting from 7 to 9pm at the Fairfield Centre. We are delighted to be able to welcome youngsters aged 10 to 14 years. We would welcome volunteers to help us with our programme of activities, so, if YOU are interested and enjoy the company of young people, please get in touch with me, at :-admin@aldeburghparishchurch.org.uk

Fran Smith, Lay Elder, Aldeburgh Parish Church